Story of Japan

Japanese History and Research for a Historical Novel

Author: David

Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 3

How to Make A Living As A Professional Fiction Writer

Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 3

So, here is the third installment of the notes for the class Larry gave at Weber State University at the end of May. There is one more part to go, and the length of time it will take to get up is dependent on a number of indefinable elements, the most important of which is “When will he get up off his ass and do something?” As before, I have placed links to the various portions of the lecture to help you navigate more easily. Have fun and hopefully, this will help you become a better writer.

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Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 2

How to Make A Living as a Professional Fiction Writer

Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 2

Yes, I know, it has been months since I put the first one up, but real life has a tendency to get in the way of one’s plans. It will be nothing like this long until I get the third one up, I have the transcription finished and just need to convert it to HTML. With luck, it will be up later today. The final one may take a bit longer, I have some deadlines for my book and some commitments on an iOS program I am working on. With luck, however, it shouldn’t take more than a week. To help navigate this very long document, I have added links to all the sections at the top. Hopefully this will have been worth the wait.

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Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 1, part 2 of 2

How to Make A Living as a Professional Fiction Writer

Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 1, part 2 of 2

Writing as Business

There is nothing wrong with things being rejected, but traditional publishing has gatekeepers and literary agents have their own standards. The funny thing is that there are bunches of literary agents that would love to be Larry’s agent, that would be a nice income stream for them, but they all rejected him. All a rejection means is that the educated guess of the publisher is that they can’t make any money on the product. There are lots of biases, political, incorrect beliefs, and other stuff go into these decisions. JKRowling, who owns Britain and recently bought Scotland as a guest house, was rejected everywhere. There was not a lot of interest in her stuff from British publishers, but in the USA, she got into the Scholastic flier and then things went completely crazy and she caught on everywhere. Continue reading

Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 1, Part 1 of 2

How to Make A Living As A Professional Fiction Writer

Larry Correia: Writing Class-–Week 1, part 1 of 2

Welcome. I am your host for this report of Larry Correia’s Creative Writing class taught at Weber State University How to Make a Living as a Professional Fiction Writer. He kindly agreed to allow me to put this together and put it here on my site. This presentation is based on the notes I took during his lecture last night. I have tried to keep as much of the spirit of his discussion as possible, while occasionally adding my own interlocutions. I have taken the liberty of rearranging some of his comments to more closely adhere to the structure of his class. So, this is not a direct transcription of the class, but massaged for understanding.

One Easy Trick To Become A Professional Writer

People are looking for the secret to become a successful novelist. Among those who attempt a professional writing career, there is a 99.999% failure rate. However, the mere fact that you are trying to get better at your craft puts you ahead of the game. That being said, there is one easy trick to becoming a professional writer:

  1. Get good enough that people will give you money for your writing.
  2. Find those people to give you their money.

The steps are simple, but the devil is in the details. Continue reading

Genesis of a fight scene

One of the most difficult parts of writing a book is making sure that everything is expressed well. There are all sorts of rules – avoid passive verbs, limit the number of adverbs, vary sentence length – but what they all boil down to is “make your writing clear, and help the reader understand what is happening.”

This is particularly difficult when dealing with fight scenes. There are a lot of people who will tell authors that they skip past the fight scenes and just jump to the end to see who survives. For some authors, the takeaway from that is that they can do a crappy job on their fight scenes.

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How to make no money and lose your mind, in one easy lesson

So, I wrote a novel. (Actually, my wife Carol is coauthor. In truth, the book would look nothing like it does now without her constant input, edits, criticism, and brainstorming. It is a much better book than I could have done on my own. However, for simplicity’s sake, I am going to use “I” here. If she wants to talk about her experience working on the book, she can write her own post.)

I had been working on it off and on for about a year, and last November, NaNoWriMo 2014 rolled around and inspired me to work during all of November, so by the end of the month, I had completed the novel, a book set in 12th century Japan that covers the misadventures of a down-on-his-luck bushi who is unfortunate enough to agree to help an old flame with a “small” favor. That small favor gets both of them involved in court politics and a plot to seize the imperial throne. That will teach him to do someone a favor.

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