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Japanese History and Research for a Historical Novel

Category: Writing (page 1 of 2)

Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 3

How to Make A Living As A Professional Fiction Writer

Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 3

So, here is the third installment of the notes for the class Larry gave at Weber State University at the end of May. There is one more part to go, and the length of time it will take to get up is dependent on a number of indefinable elements, the most important of which is “When will he get up off his ass and do something?” As before, I have placed links to the various portions of the lecture to help you navigate more easily. Have fun and hopefully, this will help you become a better writer.

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Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 2

How to Make A Living as a Professional Fiction Writer

Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 2

Yes, I know, it has been months since I put the first one up, but real life has a tendency to get in the way of one’s plans. It will be nothing like this long until I get the third one up, I have the transcription finished and just need to convert it to HTML. With luck, it will be up later today. The final one may take a bit longer, I have some deadlines for my book and some commitments on an iOS program I am working on. With luck, however, it shouldn’t take more than a week. To help navigate this very long document, I have added links to all the sections at the top. Hopefully this will have been worth the wait.

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New Kindle Direct Payment Policy

New Kindle Direct Payment Policy

Amazon had announced a new method for determining payments to authors in the Kindle Unlimited (KU) and Kindle Owners’ Lending Library (KOLL) programs. Previously the authors were getting paid when their book was borrowed and at least 10% was read. Once the book was partially read, the author got a share of the total pool paid to authors that month. It didn’t matter if the book was 10 pages long or 500, the author got the same amount for each borrow. Naturally this led to a lot of short stories and serialized books.

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The Seven Point System

The Seven Point System:

Dan Wells on Story Structure

One day Alice came to a fork in the road and saw a Cheshire cat in a tree. “Which road do I take?” she asked.
“Where do you want to go?” was his response.
“I don’t know,” Alice answered.
“Then,” said the cat, “it doesn’t matter.”

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Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 1, part 2 of 2

How to Make A Living as a Professional Fiction Writer

Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 1, part 2 of 2

Writing as Business

There is nothing wrong with things being rejected, but traditional publishing has gatekeepers and literary agents have their own standards. The funny thing is that there are bunches of literary agents that would love to be Larry’s agent, that would be a nice income stream for them, but they all rejected him. All a rejection means is that the educated guess of the publisher is that they can’t make any money on the product. There are lots of biases, political, incorrect beliefs, and other stuff go into these decisions. JKRowling, who owns Britain and recently bought Scotland as a guest house, was rejected everywhere. There was not a lot of interest in her stuff from British publishers, but in the USA, she got into the Scholastic flier and then things went completely crazy and she caught on everywhere. Continue reading

Larry Correia: Writing Class–Week 1, Part 1 of 2

How to Make A Living As A Professional Fiction Writer

Larry Correia: Writing Class-–Week 1, part 1 of 2

Welcome. I am your host for this report of Larry Correia’s Creative Writing class taught at Weber State University How to Make a Living as a Professional Fiction Writer. He kindly agreed to allow me to put this together and put it here on my site. This presentation is based on the notes I took during his lecture last night. I have tried to keep as much of the spirit of his discussion as possible, while occasionally adding my own interlocutions. I have taken the liberty of rearranging some of his comments to more closely adhere to the structure of his class. So, this is not a direct transcription of the class, but massaged for understanding.

One Easy Trick To Become A Professional Writer

People are looking for the secret to become a successful novelist. Among those who attempt a professional writing career, there is a 99.999% failure rate. However, the mere fact that you are trying to get better at your craft puts you ahead of the game. That being said, there is one easy trick to becoming a professional writer:

  1. Get good enough that people will give you money for your writing.
  2. Find those people to give you their money.

The steps are simple, but the devil is in the details. Continue reading

How to make no money and lose your mind, lesson two

This writing stuff is much harder than we realized. David found this writing site called Scribophile. It is a web site for writers where people look at your work and critique it and you do the same for them. After arriving there and showing off our shiny new novel, we learned we used the ‘passive voice’ too much and were overly fond of adverbs. Who knew? Now, it has been mumble-mumble years since I took an English class, but I wasn’t even sure what a passive voice was, and I certainly didn’t know that adverbs were bad words. My mother had a different list of forbidden words.

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Publishing Links

At some point in time we are going to finish this book.  Then what do we do?

I am going to keep track on interesting links on publishing here.

Amazon’s new ranking system:

http://madgeniusclub.com/2015/02/22/velocity-and-trajectory/

Plotting Links

 

You would think the hardest part of a novel is coming up with a plot.  It isn’t.  Anyone can come up with a plot.  We have at least three or four in one novel and keep coming up with more.  The hard part is coming up with a comprehensible plot. To keep the action rising without wandering down side streets into nowhere.  The following are a couple of websites we have used to try to make sense of our plots.

The Plotting Matrix or Rubik’s Cube:

The method described in this post in an interesting one.  It used a box with nine squares to make you think about your plot points and how they are related. I find it very helpful in forcing some organization in the novel.

Beat Sheet for Novels

Take a look at the downloadable spreadsheet on this website. While this is based on how movies are plotted, I find it useful to give us some idea of what should be seen in a novel, but more important, how far in it should happen.  For example, in a hypothetical 80,000 word novel, the “catalyst” scene should occur at about 8,800 words in.  While I certainly don’t intend to consider these guidelines as hard and fast rules, it does give us some ideas of where the novel might be lagging.


http://csidemedia.com/gryphonclerks/2012/12/16/dan-wells-seven-point-story-structure/

Synopsis Links

A synopsis a brief outline of a book.  It is often required by the publisher before he reads the book.  It is also a good look to get a clearer view of your plot.  When writing, you often can’t see the forest for the trees.
http://www.publishingcrawl.com/2012/04/17/how-to-write-a-1-page-synopsis/

 

 

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